home and business security

But you don’t have to answer the door to scare them off — just turning on a light is often enough to make them move on. And with BeON LED Bulbs, you don’t even need to be home to flick a switch. Starting at $199 for a set of three, these connected bulbs can perform a lot of neat tricks, including learning your lighting schedule to turn your lamps on and off even when you’re not home. And with an embedded microphone that can be trained to detect a doorbell, their most security minded feat is turning the lights on when it hears that familiar ding dong. Check the door from afar Schlage Sense Smart Deadbolt Schlage With several ways to unlock the Schlage Sense Smart Deadbolt, you’d think burglars would love it. But with a built in alarm ready to scare them off, the $229 Apple HomeKit compatible lock is a great way to scare off thieves if they decide to kick the door in.

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01.14.2007 | 34 Comments

Termed participatory surveillance, individuals using sites such as Facebook voluntarily provide personal information about themselves in a profile and knowingly give permission for other sites to access their profiles in order to gain access to news, weather, and other information or even to be able to play games online. Most social networking sites ask their users to provide these kinds of details. This information commonly appears in casual digital conversations within given social networking communication platforms. Consequently, personal information about people is not something necessarily hidden that must be uncovered or retrieved using exotic technologies, human agents or advanced bugging equipment. People themselves are knowingly publishing this information on public websites accessible by almost anyone with internet access and often available without cost. Additionally, the devices that gather information about others that may subsequently be used for covert surveillance today are not relegated to government alone, as presented in the novel 1984.

security alarm for homes

01.14.2007 | 16 Comments

Natalie I appreciated your in depth analysis of both Orwell's masterpiece, 1984, as well as our current situation regarding privacy in our country. It is interesting to me that the machinery of the government apparatus doesn't realize itself to be intrusive beyond its rights I just noticed that I even speak of the government as a machine. It, and the people who comprise it, see the intrusions as a means to achieving greater security. Our government, however, is ostensibly governed by "the people. " This makes the issue even more problematic given all the diversity and difference in our society. It was probably easier early on in our country's history because most people shared a common set of general values, eg being married before living together,not having children out of wedlock, serving in the military, and so on. There are so many moving parts to our system now, it's hard to keep track of them all. Plus, we move with such rapidity from one issue to the next that it seems nothing really gets resolved, it's just on we go to the next crisis. Geo political speaker, Larry McKewin would say the government likes it that way because it keeps us arguing with each other rather than keeping our government officials accountable. Thanks again for all the food for thought and for all the hard work you obviously put into this article. I also appreciated your objectivity.